One-Punch Man confirms the insane limit of Saitama’s defense

One-Punch Man fans finally have a way to measure just how tough the protagonist Saitama truly is. Spoiler: he could take a nuke.

Warning: Contains spoilers for One-punch man chapter 163

fans of One-punch man finally have a measure of the toughness of the protagonist of the manga, Saitama, is. During the fight with Garou, the former Hero Hunter turned monster is able to analyze Saitama’s defensive abilities and make an assessment which, while not as shocking given Saitama’s overpoweredness, still places his tenacity within a measurable range.

Manga fans like to put their heroes’ abilities and feats on a measurable scale to get a realistic idea of ​​how powerful they are. It is usually very difficult, but in One-punch manIn this case, it is basically impossible. The whole premise of the manga written by One and drawn by Yusuke Murats is that the protagonist, the professional hero Saitama, is absurdly powerful. His feats of strength are used for comedic effect and to emphasize the difference between him and everyone else. Of course, that hasn’t stopped fans from trying to gauge just how powerful Saitama would be in real life. In the past, Saitama’s lifting ability was used to measure his raw strength and the power of his punch. Its impressive jump from the Moon to the Earth was used as a reference to measure its speed. His tenacity, which allows him to take the most powerful attacks and get away without a scratch, has so far never had a term of measure.

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During the ongoing fight against Garou in Chapter 163 of the digital manga, the former martial artist who has undergone the “monsterification” process unleashes a barrage of attacks on Saitama who, as always, does very little to dodge. In fact, Garou’s combat skills and refined style of martial arts, the Monster Calamity God Slayer Fist, make it nearly impossible for Saitama to dodge his attacks. After Garou undergoes another transformation triggered by his anger, he kicks Saitama into the side of a volcano, then charges a huge amount of energy into his fists and unleashes it on the bald hero’s body. When Garou sees that the impact has penetrated the hero’s body and shattered the volcano behind him, but Saitama is unharmed, he correctly concludes that his body must be stronger than the object behind it. So Saitama is tougher than a mountain.



What does this mean in real life? According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, a mountain has never been destroyed by an artificial device. The most powerful conventional bomb ever used was dropped in 2017 on the lower edge of a mountain in Afghanistan. He destroyed a few caves but the mountains themselves were hardly affected. Also in 2017, the shape of Mount Mantap in Korea was changed after six nuclear tests were conducted under it in the space of 11 years, with the sixth test being perhaps ten times more powerful than the bomb used in Hiroshima. Nevertheless, the mountain remained intact. Therefore, Garou’s attack hits with over ten times the power of the Fat Boy Bomb (thus over 150 kilotons), and Saitama is completely unaffected.


harder than a mountain“might be a common saying, but in scientific terms, even the most powerful weapons known to man are not capable of destroying a mountain. Saitama might then be completely invulnerable, or at least anything that might harm him would release energy on a scale that Of course, it’s worth remembering that applying science to fiction, and manga in particular, can be a fun exercise but one that’s far from precise, both the approximation and suspension of disbelief are always part of it. One-punch man can accept this, so they now have some measure of understanding just how much the limitations of Saitamastrength and defense are.


Next: One-Punch Man Will Prove If Saitama Can Beat His Version Of The Hulk

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica

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